The Tule River bed where water once flowed has now turned into a garbage dump in East Porterville, California April 6, 2015 where residents haven't seen water flow in over a year. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

The Tule River bed where water once flowed has now turned into a garbage dump in East Porterville, California April 6, 2015 where residents haven't seen water flow in over a year. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 An angry farmer hurt by the recent drought has erected protest signs in his dead orchard near Fresno, California. The drought could cost billions in agriculture loses for the state which is the countries largest producer of fruit and vegetables. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

An angry farmer hurt by the recent drought has erected protest signs in his dead orchard near Fresno, California. The drought could cost billions in agriculture loses for the state which is the countries largest producer of fruit and vegetables. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A front end loader chews through rows of dead grape vines in Fresno, California April 3, 2015. Matthew Efird a fifth generation farmer made the painful decision to rip up his grape vines to save water for the more valuable almond orchard. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A front end loader chews through rows of dead grape vines in Fresno, California April 3, 2015. Matthew Efird a fifth generation farmer made the painful decision to rip up his grape vines to save water for the more valuable almond orchard. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A fish lies dead on the beach of the Salton Sea in Southern California April 8, 2015. The Salton Sea was accidentally created by engineers in 1905 building irrigation canals for farming. The sea is slowly dying as the water evaporates and its main source of water of run off from nearby farms is slowing. Palm Springs, California is one highest users of water in the sate as it feeds their thirst for lawns, pools and golf courses.  (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A fish lies dead on the beach of the Salton Sea in Southern California April 8, 2015. The Salton Sea was accidentally created by engineers in 1905 building irrigation canals for farming. The sea is slowly dying as the water evaporates and its main source of water of run off from nearby farms is slowing. Palm Springs, California is one highest users of water in the sate as it feeds their thirst for lawns, pools and golf courses. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Fields of lettuce are watered as others are harvested Salinas, California April 4, 2015. Often referred to as America's salad blow California produces over half of the countries country�s fruits, vegetables and nuts. The agriculture industry is a heavy user of water and accounts for more than three-quarters of California�s water usage. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Fields of lettuce are watered as others are harvested Salinas, California April 4, 2015. Often referred to as America's salad blow California produces over half of the countries country�s fruits, vegetables and nuts. The agriculture industry is a heavy user of water and accounts for more than three-quarters of California�s water usage. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Dirk Giannini of Christensen and Giannini farms makes a call from his truck in Salinas, California April 4, 2015 before inspecting Romaine lettuce which is ready to be harvested. Dirk Giannini worries ash from a large, early and prolonged forest fire season could damage his crops. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Dirk Giannini of Christensen and Giannini farms makes a call from his truck in Salinas, California April 4, 2015 before inspecting Romaine lettuce which is ready to be harvested. Dirk Giannini worries ash from a large, early and prolonged forest fire season could damage his crops. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Howard (left) and his wife Donna (R)  Johnson help out East Porterville resident Beto Orozco April 7, 2015 as they fill drums with water from the local fire station. The untreated water must be neutralized with bleach to kill off bacteria and mosquito larva. East Porterville, a rural community in California's Tulare County that is among the hardest hit by the drought where many have been with out water for over a year. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Howard (left) and his wife Donna (R) Johnson help out East Porterville resident Beto Orozco April 7, 2015 as they fill drums with water from the local fire station. The untreated water must be neutralized with bleach to kill off bacteria and mosquito larva. East Porterville, a rural community in California's Tulare County that is among the hardest hit by the drought where many have been with out water for over a year. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Broccoli seedings and a row of Romaine lettuce ready to be harvested in Salinas, California April 4, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Broccoli seedings and a row of Romaine lettuce ready to be harvested in Salinas, California April 4, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Matthew Efird who's family has been faming the same land for five generations stands in amongst the almond tress and is very worried about the future of his farm and if the drought continues fears he could be the last generation to farm. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Matthew Efird who's family has been faming the same land for five generations stands in amongst the almond tress and is very worried about the future of his farm and if the drought continues fears he could be the last generation to farm. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A drilling outfit at a almond orchard in Huron, California April 4, 2015 will drill 24-hours a day for up two months to a depth of  2,300 feet looking for a new source of water. Some famers have spent $500,000 US or more drilling for water which is never a sure bet. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A drilling outfit at a almond orchard in Huron, California April 4, 2015 will drill 24-hours a day for up two months to a depth of 2,300 feet looking for a new source of water. Some famers have spent $500,000 US or more drilling for water which is never a sure bet. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Dirk Giannini of Christensen and Giannini looks over a broccoli crop in Salinas, California April 4, 2015 "Our farming practices and crop rotations have not changed, but the farmers are trying to find ways to make the crop more efficient in its uptake of all our resources, including water and nutrients." (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Dirk Giannini of Christensen and Giannini looks over a broccoli crop in Salinas, California April 4, 2015 "Our farming practices and crop rotations have not changed, but the farmers are trying to find ways to make the crop more efficient in its uptake of all our resources, including water and nutrients." (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Beto Orozco who's well ran dry over a year ago lives in East Porterville, a rural community in California's Tulare County and needs to supplement the city's water delivery to his home by making a weekly trips the to the local fire station for more water. Beto Orozco who lives with 14 other family members has been relying on the kindness Donna Johnson who has been supplying her own truck and gas to help out with those who have no water. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Beto Orozco who's well ran dry over a year ago lives in East Porterville, a rural community in California's Tulare County and needs to supplement the city's water delivery to his home by making a weekly trips the to the local fire station for more water. Beto Orozco who lives with 14 other family members has been relying on the kindness Donna Johnson who has been supplying her own truck and gas to help out with those who have no water. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 An almond plucked fresh from tree with it's husk still on and the dry ground where grape vines once grew pulled to save water for the almond tress in Fresno, California April 3, 2015. California is responsible for all most all almond supply in the United States and about 90 per cent of almonds imported into Canada. In the past decade, the state�s almond industry has quadrupled, becoming a $5-billion-a-year business. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

An almond plucked fresh from tree with it's husk still on and the dry ground where grape vines once grew pulled to save water for the almond tress in Fresno, California April 3, 2015. California is responsible for all most all almond supply in the United States and about 90 per cent of almonds imported into Canada. In the past decade, the state�s almond industry has quadrupled, becoming a $5-billion-a-year business. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Manuel Dominguez, 86, lives in East Porterville, a rural community in California's Tulare County that is among the hardest hit by the drought. When Mr. Dominguez's well ran dry more than a year ago, his girlfriend, Gloria Acosta, filled a jug with a couple of gallons of water and brought it to him. She was forced to stop when a neighbour reported her and the city of Porterville who warned her she would face a fine $500 if she continued. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Manuel Dominguez, 86, lives in East Porterville, a rural community in California's Tulare County that is among the hardest hit by the drought. When Mr. Dominguez's well ran dry more than a year ago, his girlfriend, Gloria Acosta, filled a jug with a couple of gallons of water and brought it to him. She was forced to stop when a neighbour reported her and the city of Porterville who warned her she would face a fine $500 if she continued. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)