Dancers, the athletes of the art world spend years training and turning their bodies and movements into works of art. Over a series of images in collaboration with Ballet BC I was able to combine art and journalism for a visual story on B.C. events over the past year. My favourite image from the photo assay was of Ballet BC’s Tara Williamson who I photographed in Vancouver’s Chinatown. It’s impossible to imagine B.C. without Chinese immigration – so integral has it been to this society. Recent controversial – and unproven – opinions suggesting a link between Vancouver’s sky-high housing prices and Chinese buyers have made a lot of people uncomfortable. 
. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Dancers, the athletes of the art world spend years training and turning their bodies and movements into works of art. Over a series of images in collaboration with Ballet BC I was able to combine art and journalism for a visual story on B.C. events over the past year. My favourite image from the photo assay was of Ballet BC’s Tara Williamson who I photographed in Vancouver’s Chinatown. It’s impossible to imagine B.C. without Chinese immigration – so integral has it been to this society. Recent controversial – and unproven – opinions suggesting a link between Vancouver’s sky-high housing prices and Chinese buyers have made a lot of people uncomfortable. . (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Surfer Hanna Scott during her gold medal winning ride in the shortboard event at the 2015 Queen of the Peak surfing competition in Tofino, B.C. October 3, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Surfer Hanna Scott during her gold medal winning ride in the shortboard event at the 2015 Queen of the Peak surfing competition in Tofino, B.C. October 3, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A very large female polar bear at the mouth of the Seal River on shores of Hudson Bay 60km North of Churchill, Manitoba July 31, 2015. The harsh environment polar bears evolved to master is melting under their massive feet, forcing the planet’s largest land-based predators to forage far inland where they have difficulty finding prey. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A very large female polar bear at the mouth of the Seal River on shores of Hudson Bay 60km North of Churchill, Manitoba July 31, 2015. The harsh environment polar bears evolved to master is melting under their massive feet, forcing the planet’s largest land-based predators to forage far inland where they have difficulty finding prey. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Robert Lynn Green Senior sits on the stairs of his old home July 17, 2015 which was washed away in the flooding after Hurricane Katrina. Mr. Green Lost his grandmother and granddaughter and vows to keep his cross lit until The Lower Ninth Ward is repopulated. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Robert Lynn Green Senior sits on the stairs of his old home July 17, 2015 which was washed away in the flooding after Hurricane Katrina. Mr. Green Lost his grandmother and granddaughter and vows to keep his cross lit until The Lower Ninth Ward is repopulated. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Roy Mulvahill and Marvin William ride in a covered wagon during the Xeni Gwet'in Youth Wagon Trip June 23, 2015. The eight day trip starts in the Nemiah Valley and ends up in Williams Lake for the start of the Williams Lake Rodeo. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Roy Mulvahill and Marvin William ride in a covered wagon during the Xeni Gwet'in Youth Wagon Trip June 23, 2015. The eight day trip starts in the Nemiah Valley and ends up in Williams Lake for the start of the Williams Lake Rodeo. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Marcel Martin harvests gooseneck barnacles in Clayoquot Sound near Tofino September 20, 2015. The prized crustacean can only be caught during narrow windows when the tide is at its lowest and seas are calm. The Nuu-Chah-Nulth first nation have stepped up in the wake of the fishery's reopening. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Marcel Martin harvests gooseneck barnacles in Clayoquot Sound near Tofino September 20, 2015. The prized crustacean can only be caught during narrow windows when the tide is at its lowest and seas are calm. The Nuu-Chah-Nulth first nation have stepped up in the wake of the fishery's reopening. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Will Grimm with BC Wildfire Services doses hotspots as crews mop-up after a successful controlled burn at the North end of the Sechelt forest fire on B.C.'s Sunshine coast July 9, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Will Grimm with BC Wildfire Services doses hotspots as crews mop-up after a successful controlled burn at the North end of the Sechelt forest fire on B.C.'s Sunshine coast July 9, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 An outsider attending a First Nations Pot Latch is a rare event and being able to photograph one is almost impossible. The pot Latch ceremony is to held celebrate the communities history and future, was banned under colonial rule. Now years later First Nations across Canada are slowing bring back their own history and culture. The Willie Family Potlatch who are members of the Kwakwaka’wakw First Nation in Alert Bay on Cormorant Island, B.C. March 7, 2015 where a Ceremony was held for the new Sisuitl Symbol which Green peace has used since 1971. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

An outsider attending a First Nations Pot Latch is a rare event and being able to photograph one is almost impossible. The pot Latch ceremony is to held celebrate the communities history and future, was banned under colonial rule. Now years later First Nations across Canada are slowing bring back their own history and culture. The Willie Family Potlatch who are members of the Kwakwaka’wakw First Nation in Alert Bay on Cormorant Island, B.C. March 7, 2015 where a Ceremony was held for the new Sisuitl Symbol which Green peace has used since 1971. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Toronto Blue Jays centre fielder Kevin Pillar catches a fly ball from Texas Ranger Josh Hamilton in the fourth inning of game five of the American League Division Series Oct 14, 2015 in Toronto. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Toronto Blue Jays centre fielder Kevin Pillar catches a fly ball from Texas Ranger Josh Hamilton in the fourth inning of game five of the American League Division Series Oct 14, 2015 in Toronto. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A polar bear feeds on the fresh kill of beluga whale at the mouth of Seal River which runs into Hudson Bay 60km North of Churchill, Manitoba July 31, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A polar bear feeds on the fresh kill of beluga whale at the mouth of Seal River which runs into Hudson Bay 60km North of Churchill, Manitoba July 31, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A night time photo of a Joshua Tree illuminated by the break lights from a passing car at Joshua Tree National Park California May 11, 2015. This multiple exposure shows the earth's rotation in one image. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A night time photo of a Joshua Tree illuminated by the break lights from a passing car at Joshua Tree National Park California May 11, 2015. This multiple exposure shows the earth's rotation in one image. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A woman shields her baby as a beer can hits catch fencing after fans reacted by throwing beer and other items on the field  following a controversial call during game five of the American League Division Series between the Toronto Blue Jays and the Texas Rangers Oct 14, 2015 in Toronto. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A woman shields her baby as a beer can hits catch fencing after fans reacted by throwing beer and other items on the field following a controversial call during game five of the American League Division Series between the Toronto Blue Jays and the Texas Rangers Oct 14, 2015 in Toronto. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Tim Langmaid project manager for Hatch MacDonald inspects 3.5 metre-wide tunnel, located 30 metres below the river bed between Surrey and Port Coquitlam September 10, 2015. This is Metro Vancouver’s most-complicated Water Services projects and recently reached a milestone the tunnelling deep below the Fraser River is now complete for the new Port Mann water main. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Tim Langmaid project manager for Hatch MacDonald inspects 3.5 metre-wide tunnel, located 30 metres below the river bed between Surrey and Port Coquitlam September 10, 2015. This is Metro Vancouver’s most-complicated Water Services projects and recently reached a milestone the tunnelling deep below the Fraser River is now complete for the new Port Mann water main. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 A sub adult grizzly bear chases down a salmon near Klemtu, B.C. August 29, 2015. When salmon runs dwindle on the B.C. coast, the stress levels in grizzlies climb, say researchers who examined hair samples collected from more than 70 bears. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

A sub adult grizzly bear chases down a salmon near Klemtu, B.C. August 29, 2015. When salmon runs dwindle on the B.C. coast, the stress levels in grizzlies climb, say researchers who examined hair samples collected from more than 70 bears. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Farm workers harvest lettuce in the early hours of the morning in in Salinas, California April 11, 2015 during one of the largest drought crisis to hit the state. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Farm workers harvest lettuce in the early hours of the morning in in Salinas, California April 11, 2015 during one of the largest drought crisis to hit the state. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 William B Davis, the actor who played the villainous Cigarette-Smoking Man in the X-files at his home in Vancouver March 27, 2015 after it was announced the show would return for a six-episode miniseries . (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

William B Davis, the actor who played the villainous Cigarette-Smoking Man in the X-files at his home in Vancouver March 27, 2015 after it was announced the show would return for a six-episode miniseries . (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 St. Michael's Residential School survivor Josie Hanuse (black hat) is over come with emotion during a symbolic decommission and demolition of the former residential school in Albert Bay February 18, 2015. Josie Hanuse brought the same same suit case she carried into the school for the first time at the age of five in 1967. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

St. Michael's Residential School survivor Josie Hanuse (black hat) is over come with emotion during a symbolic decommission and demolition of the former residential school in Albert Bay February 18, 2015. Josie Hanuse brought the same same suit case she carried into the school for the first time at the age of five in 1967. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Ian Ferugson the author of How to be a Canadian seen here in Victoria, B.C. February 5, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Ian Ferugson the author of How to be a Canadian seen here in Victoria, B.C. February 5, 2015. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 As photojournalist I’m always looking for a moment in time which best tells a story visually. Often  those moments come before or after an event. I was in Fort McMurray for a story on the growing  Islamic community and how it was taking root in Canada’s oil patch. A group of Islamic women living and working in Fort McMurray had come together celebrate world hijab day in Fort McMurray at a local mall. The international event put on around the globe is a day of education for non muslims and a day to celebrate their faith. The group of proud muslims women stopped and posed for a group photo just before the start of the event. I love the sea of colourful hijabs and how as a group their not focused on me but their friend who climbed the stairs to take their photo.
 (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

As photojournalist I’m always looking for a moment in time which best tells a story visually. Often those moments come before or after an event. I was in Fort McMurray for a story on the growing Islamic community and how it was taking root in Canada’s oil patch. A group of Islamic women living and working in Fort McMurray had come together celebrate world hijab day in Fort McMurray at a local mall. The international event put on around the globe is a day of education for non muslims and a day to celebrate their faith. The group of proud muslims women stopped and posed for a group photo just before the start of the event. I love the sea of colourful hijabs and how as a group their not focused on me but their friend who climbed the stairs to take their photo. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

 Carole Itter, a prominent Vancouver artists, at her squatters cabin in Cates Park, North Vancouver January 19, 2015. The cabin which she has used along with her husband Al Neil for the past 40 years is slated to be ripped down. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Carole Itter, a prominent Vancouver artists, at her squatters cabin in Cates Park, North Vancouver January 19, 2015. The cabin which she has used along with her husband Al Neil for the past 40 years is slated to be ripped down. (John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)